Soualiga
Menu

Soualiga (6045)

Survivors of ISIL terror in Iraq want justice, not revenge, says head of UN investigation team

INTERNATIONAL, 15 July 2019, Peace and Security - The scale and barbarity of the crimes committed by ISIL have ultimately served not to divide but to unify, Karim Asad Ahmad Khan, head of the UN Investigative Team to Promote Accountability for Crimes Committed by Da’esh/Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (UNITAD), told the Security Council on Monday. 

Mr. Khan was delivering his second report on the activities of UNITAD, during which he confirmed that his team has made “significant progress” in implementing its’ mandate, and that he expects investigators to provide concrete support for at least one case before the national courts, marking an “important milestone” in the delivery of their mandate. 

The team, he said, had heard harrowing accounts of “mass killings, of entire families erased and of women and girls taken as slaves”.  

He added that their courage in coming forward served to underline both “their continued heroism and the urgency with which we must work in order to deliver meaningfully on the promise made to them”, referring to the 2017 Security Council resolution that led to the creation of UNITAD. 

The message of the survivors — from Shia, Sunni, Yazidi, Christian, Kaka’i, Shabak and Turkmen communities — is that ISIL fighters must face justice, not revenge, he stated. 

‘Significant progress’ being made 

The progress that Mr. Khan referred to during his briefing includes putting in place core staffing, facilities and evidence collection practices; the employment of 79 staff members in Iraq – including criminal investigators, analysts, witness protection experts and forensic scientists – 55 per cent of whom are women; and the collection of documentary, digital, testimonial and forensic material is now being collected. 

Initial investigative work is focused on three areas:  attacks committed by ISIL against the Yazidi community in the Sinjar district in August 2014, crimes committed by ISIL in Mosul between 2014 and 2016, and the mass killing of unarmed Iraqi air force cadets from Tikrit Air Academy in June 2014. 

In the last two weeks alone, said Mr. Khan, UNITAD has gained access to more than 600,000 videos related to ISIL crimes relevant to investigative work, as well as over 15,000 pages of internal ISIL documents originally obtained from the battlefield by leading investigative journalists. 

The Investigative Team, continued Mr. Khan, has received crucial support, from the Government of Iraq, Iraqi national authorities, and the Kurdistan Regional Government. Going forward, the team’s work remains dependent on the continued support of the Security Council and the international community more broadly. 

The ultimate success of the work of UNITAD, concluded Mr. Khan, will depend on the investigative team’s ability to draw on its independent and impartial status in order to make its work the “product of a collective endeavour”: a partnership between the Council, the victims and survivors of ISIL, national authorities and local actors, non-governmental organizations and academic institutions.   

“It is only through such unity, and through our common recognition of the scale and gravity of the crimes committed by ISIL, that meaningful accountability can be achieved”. 

Read more...

‘We won’t get to zero cases of Ebola without a big scale-up in funding,’ UN relief chief warns

INTERNATIONAL, 15 July 2019, Health - Deadly, attacks on health workers in Ebola-hit areas of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), including one at the weekend that left two dead, are an indication that combating the disease outbreak will require far greater international support, UN humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock said on Monday. 

Speaking in Geneva, Mr. Lowcock, the UN Emergency Relief Coordinator, insisted on the need to “be honest with ourselves” on tackling the haemorrhagic disease …unless there’s a big scale-up in the response, we’re unlikely to be successful in getting to zero cases”. 

At his side, World Health Organization (WHODirector-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus confirmed the attacks in Beni and the identification – for the first time – of an infected patient in Goma, a city of one million people bordering Rwanda. 

According to WHO, almost 3,000 health workers have so far been vaccinated against the disease in Goma. 

Insisting that he was confident sufficient preventative measures had been put in place, Mr. Tedros announced that he had decided to reconvene an Emergency Committee “as soon as possible to assess the threat of this development and advise me accordingly”. 

The two top UN officials were chairing a high-level event on the ourbreak that included the DRC Minister of Health, Dr. Oly Ilunga, the Minister for Solidarity and Humanitarian Action, Bernard Biando Sango, and the Secretary of State for International Development of the United Kingdom, the Rt. Hon. Rory Stewart, as keynote speakers.

More than 2,400 cases of infection, 1,650 deaths 

Since the latest Ebola outbreak was officially declared in the eastern DRC provinces of North Kivu and Ituri last August, there have been more than 2,400 confirmed and probable cases and 1,647 deaths, according to latest data from the country’s authorities. 

Despite the high toll, the ongoing risk to neighbouring countries – not least Uganda, which has just overcome a recent case of DRC-originating Ebola infection – and reports that the disease has reached the large city of Goma for the first time via an infected pastor, Mr. Lowcock noted that “just a small fraction” of the $2 billion fund to tackle the 2014-16 West Africa Ebola outbreak has been made available to date. 

The UN official also credited MONUSCO, the UN peacekeeping mission in DRC, for facilitating the work of health teams tasked with tracing potential Ebola patients, in areas prone to attack by armed groups, in an appeal for greater political and financial support. 

Without this help, Mr. Lowcock warned, Ebola treatment centres risk closing. 
It is also likely that there will be fewer teams able to carry out the vital work to “immediately investigate, isolate, treat and trace each new case, no matter where the disease pops up”, he said. 

“We have started to get some momentum in former hotspots Butembo and Katwa, but unless we scale up the response we risk losing it,” he added. “The cheapest strategy is to invest fully at this point and to stop the current outbreak rather than to under-invest now and have the outbreak linger over a longer timeframe and possibly spread further geographically.” 

Health worker attacks near 200 since January: WHO’s Tedros 

Echoing that message, WHO’s Mr. Tedros noted that although the Ebola case in Goma was very concerning, the agency had already vaccinated 3,000 people and ensured that the infected pastor was receiving care. 

The deaths of two Ebola responders – “murdered in their home” – brought to almost 200 the number of attacks on health facilities and workers since January, with seven people killed in the violence to date, Mr. Tedros said, noting that every incident “gives Ebola an opportunity to spread..(it) gets a free ride in each and every attack”. 

“Just when we start to get control of the virus in one area, it appears in another,” the WHO top official said. “Every attack sets us back. Every attack makes it more difficult to trace contacts, vaccinate and perform safe burials.”  

Despite the complexity of the challenge in DRC and the “very high” risk of further spread, the efforts of front-line responders, the Ministry of Health, WHO and partners have been “heroic”, Mr. Tedros said, in reference to the more than 161,000 people vaccinated, 140,000 contacts traced and 71 million travellers screened, at a cost of $250 million “and counting”. 

‘Frankly, I am embarrassed to talk only about Ebola’ 

Outside DRC, moreover, more than 10,000 people have been vaccinated in Uganda, South Sudan and Rwanda, he continued, while noting that after several visits to DRC, he had come to realize that it had many more problems to contend with than Ebola. 

“I have travelled to North Kivu six times during this outbreak,” he said. “Frankly, I am embarrassed to talk only about Ebola. Together, we will end this outbreak. But unless we address its root causes – the weak health system, the insecurity and the political instability – there will be another outbreak.” 

Read more...

‘No hope’ global development goals can be achieved without women, says UN Assembly President

INTERNATIONAL, 15 July 2019, Women - Without the full participation and leadership of women, “we have no hope” of realizing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the President of the United Nations General Assembly told gender equality leaders on Monday.

“This is an obvious point to make, but it is, sadly, one that we cannot repeat enough”, she said, opening the day-long discussion at UN Headquarters in New York to identify best practices aimed to knock down barriers hindering women’s full participation and leadership, in what she called “our shared mission this year”.  

 As the fourth woman in UN history to ever preside over the General Assembly, the Organization’s main and most representative deliberative body, María Fernanda Espinosarecognized that women decision-makers must lead by example to safeguard achievements and accelerate progress towards gender equality.

Noting that women have come a long way since the adoption of the Beijing Platform for Action nearly 25 years ago, she pointed out that they still lag behind on virtually every Sustainable Development Goal (SDG).

“For example, just 42 per cent of countries give women the same rights to land ownership; just 60 per cent give women equal access to financial services”, she flagged. “And the gap is even greater for women in rural areas, women with disabilities, indigenous women and older women”.

Moreover, “no country has achieved full gender equality” and women continue to face discrimination in every region of the world, “from suffocating stereotypes to discriminatory laws, harmful practices and violence”, she maintained.

This runs counter to the “wealth of hard evidence” of the positive impact that “women’s participation and leadership have on economic stability, good governance and investment, including in health, education and social protection.

Child mortality decreases by almost 10 per cent for each additional year of education women of reproductive age have.

“This is just an example of the transformative, society-wide benefits of women’s empowerment”, Ms. Espinosa said. “Today’s discussion is anchored in this crucial link”.

Call for Action

The event, “Gender Equality and Women’s Leadership for a Sustainable World”, issued a 'Call for Action' that aligned with the theme of this year’s High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development: 'Empowering people and ensuring inclusiveness and equality”. The Forum, the main UN platform monitoring follow-up on States’ actions towards the SDGs, is currently under way in New York.

She invited all leaders to join the global “Call”, which 18 world leaders supported, as new synergies were being explored with other initiatives.

“Many of you will have heard me refer to gender equality as the closest thing we have to a ‘magic formula’ for sustainable development”, she said, noting that while “magical in terms of impact”, there is “nothing magical about how to achieve gender equality”.

The 2030 Agenda and the Beijing Declaration and Platform of Action set out what must be done to empower women and girls, and what is needed now are “greater political will; a razor-sharp focus on the most transformative, practical actions; and to widen their scale and impact” according to the Assembly President.

“Today, we find ourselves in urgent need of renewed leadership, partnership and mobilization”, stressed Ms. Espinosa. “It is no secret that some of the SDG targets relating to women’s rights were the subject of tough negotiations… and the landscape has become more challenging even since then”.

She underscored that “we cannot take for granted the gains we have made”. And painted a picture of women on the ground working hard, “under duress and at great personal risk” to push back against a pushback, spelling out that they “need our support”.

“This is our opportunity to recommit to women’s rights and empowerment, to rise to challenges old and new, and – reclaim the agenda”, concluded the Assembly President.

Agents of change

Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed told the meeting that women have a strong track record as agents of change.

“From boardrooms to parliament, from military ranks to peace tables and, of course, in the United Nations itself, more women decision-makers mean more inclusive solutions that will benefit everyone”.

Because women understand “intrinsically” the importance of dignity, equality and opportunity for all, the deputy UN chief upheld that “women’s leadership and greater gender balance will lead to unlocking trillions for economies, enhanced bottom lines for the private sector and stronger, more sustainable peace agreements”.  

In addition to that, she stressed that “it is critical that we emphasize that women’s equal participation is a basic democratic right”.

For her part, Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director of UN Women, said that next year, when we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the implementation of Beijing Platform, “our theme is ‘Generation Equality’ because we are emphasizing the importance of intra-generational participation and the role of young people to take us forward”.

“All of these, drawn together, give us a fighting chance to increase and sustain the participation of women”, she underscored. “We can’t wait people, time is up. Time is really, really up”.

The high-level meeting brought together prominent women leaders from around the globe, including a Mexican Member of Parliament Gabriela Cuevas Barron who is also the president of the Inter Parliamentarian Union and Helen Clark, former head of the UN Development Programme (UNDP).  

Read more...

Baby foods high in sugar, inappropriately marketed in Europe, reveal two UN studies

INTERNATIONAL, 15 July 2019, Health - Proper nutrition for newborn babies into early childhood is key to development and good health in later life, according to the Regional Director of the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) in Europe, as she launched two new studies on Monday.

The studies from WHO Europe show that a high proportion of baby foods are incorrectly marketed as suitable for infants under the age of six months, when in fact much of it contains inappropriately high levels of sugar.

WHO’s long-standing recommendation spells out that children should be breastfed, exclusively, for the first six months. Moreover, its 2016 global Guidance on Ending the Inappropriate Promotion of Foods for Infants and Young Children explicitly states that commercial complementary foods should not be advertised for infants under six months of age.

“Good nutrition in infancy and early childhood remains key to ensuring optimal child growth and development, and to better health outcomes later in life – including the prevention of overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases – thereby making United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3 to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages much more achievable,” said Zsuzsanna Jakab.

Nutritional quality break-down

To determine which foods are inappropriate for children between the ages of six and 36 months, WHO developed a draft Nutrient Profile Model (NPM), which it submitted to Member States and others to assess.

WHO/Europe also developed a methodology for collecting nutritional content data on commercial baby foods from labels, packaging, promotions and claims that was used between November 2017 and January 2018 in Vienna, Austria; Sofia, Bulgaria; Budapest, Hungary; and Haifa, Israel.

Based on 516 stores and 7,955 products retailed for babies and young children, the data revealed that from 28 to 60 per cent of the products in all four cities were marketed as suitable for infants under the age of six months.

Although this is permitted under European Union law, it goes against both the WHO International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and the WHO Guidance.

There are concerns that many products may still be too high in sugars – World Health Organization, Europe

“Foods for infants and young children are expected to comply with various established nutrition and compositional recommendations”, said João Breda, Head of the WHO European Office for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases. “Nonetheless, there are concerns that many products may still be too high in sugars”.

Moreover, in three of the cities, over 30 per cent of the calories in half or more of the products came from sugars. Around one-third listed sugar, concentrated fruit juice or other sweetening agents as an ingredient, which could affect children’s taste preferences for sweeter foods.

Although foods such as fruits and vegetables that naturally contain sugars are appropriate for infants and young children, the very high level of free sugars in puréed commercial products is cause for concern.

The draft NPM was developed by following recommended WHO steps and informed by several data sources, including a literature review. It refers to existing European Commission directives and Codex Alimentarius standards, and reflects the approach used for the WHO/Europe NPM for children over 36 months.

The draft NPM was validated against label information from 1,328 products on the market in three countries from 2016 to 2017, and pilot-tested in seven additional countries in 2018 with a further 1,314 products.

Read more...

UN highlights importance of skills development on World Youth Skills Day

INTERNATIONAL, 15 July 2019, Culture and Education - At UN Headquarters, and across the globe, events are taking place on Monday to celebrate World Youth Skills Day – marked each year on 15 July – to raise awareness about the importance of youth skills development.

The Day is important because rising youth unemployment is seen as one of the most significant problems facing economies and societies in today’s world, for developed and developing countries alike.

Some 73 million young people are currently unemployed, with 40 million joining the labour market each year. To tackle the problem, at least 475 million new jobs need to be created over the next decade.

Skills for all

However, data suggests that many graduates are ill-prepared for the world of work, and the UN is working to ensure that as many young people as possible have the skillset to prosper in the job market.

Education and training are central part of the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which aims to end poverty and inequality, whilst preserving the planet. Goal 4 of the Agenda is to “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”.

A significant aspect of Goal 4 is the development of technical and vocational education and training. Improving access to these skills is expected to address economic, social and environmental demands, by helping youth and adults develop the skills they need for employment, decent work and entrepreneurship.

The UN believes that these skills can equip youth with the skills required to access the world of work, and start their own businesses; and make young people more resilient in the face of a market that demands more flexibility, helping to increase productivity and increase wage levels.

They can also reduce access barriers to the world of work, through work-based learning, and ensuring that skills gained are recognised and certified; and offer skills development opportunities for low-skilled people who are unemployed.

Read more...

‘Complacency’ a factor in stagnating global vaccination rates, warn UN health chiefs

INTERNATIONAL, 15 July 2019, Health - More than one in 10 children – almost 20 million worldwide – failed to receive potentially lifesaving vaccines in 2018, the UN said on Monday, citing obstacles including conflict, cost and complacency. 

According to a joint study by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), 10 countries accounted for 11.7 of the 19.4 million under and non-vaccinated youngsters in the world, in particular Nigeria (three million), India (2.6 million) and Pakistan (1.4 million). 

At the same time, global protection against four diseases that are regarded as a gauge of overall coverage - diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis  and measles - has “stalled” at around 86 per cent since 2010, the study found.  

95 per cent coverage rate still eludes many countries 

A far higher level of coverage is needed to protect against vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks, UN health experts insist, noting that 118 countries achieved a 90 per cent coverage threshold last year. Ideally, it should be 95 per cent across countries and communities globally, they maintain. 

Vaccines are one of our most important toolsfor preventing outbreaks and keeping the world safe,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. 

He added that while most of the world’s children are being vaccinated, “far too many are left behind...It’s often those who are most at risk – the poorest, the most marginalized, those touched by conflict or forced from their homes - who are persistently missed.” 

Data shows that the best regional performer for vaccine reach in 2018 was Europe, whose more than 90 per cent rate was 18 per cent higher than Africa, the lowest-performing region. 

Worryingly, of the 19.4 million children worldwide who have not received three doses of vaccine to protect against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis – two-thirds “didn’t even receive an initial dose”, the UN report noted, underscoring that this points to a lack of basic immunization services. 

Most unvaccinated children come from the world’s poorest countries and a disproportionate number live in fragile or conflict-affected states.  

Conflict-hit countries are home to most at-risk children 

Almost half of these at-risk youngsters are in 16 countries: Afghanistan, the Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. 

“If these children do get sick, they are at risk of the severest health consequences, and least likely to access lifesaving treatment and care,” WHO/UNICEF said in a joint statement. 

Measles outbreaks reveal ‘entrenched gaps’ in coverage 

Citing major gaps in measles vaccine coverage across countries at all income levels, from Ukraine to the DRC to Madgascar, the UN report showed that the number of cases of the highly infectious disease doubled from 2017 to 2018, to more than 340,000. 

“Measles is a real time indicator of where we have more work to do to fight preventable diseases,” said UNICEF’s Executive Director, Henrietta Fore. “Because measles is so contagious, an outbreak points to communities that are missing out on vaccines due to access, costs or, in some places, complacency. We have to exhaust every effort to immunize every child.” 

Identifying Ukraine as the country with the highest measles incidence rate in 2018, the WHO/UNICEF report suggested that although the country has vaccinated over 90 per cent of its children, coverage in 2010 was just 56 per cent, meaning that a large number of older children and adults were at risk. 

For first time, data available on vaccine that protects girls from cervical cancer 

Data is also available for the first time on coverage of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which protects girls against cervical cancer later in life. 

As of 2018, 90 countries – home to one in three girls worldwide – offered the HPV vaccine.  

But only 13 of these were lower-income countries, WHO/UNICEF said, meaning that those most at risk of cervical cancer are still least likely to have access to the vaccine. 

Read more...

Over 820 million people suffering from hunger; new UN report reveals stubborn realities of ‘immense’ global challenge

INTERNATIONAL, 15 July 2019, Economic Development - After nearly a decade of progress, the number of people who suffer from hunger has slowly increased over the past three years, with about one in every nine people globally suffering from hunger today, the United Nations said in a new report released on Monday.

This fact underscores “the immense challenge” to achieving the Zero Hunger target of the Sustainable Development Goals(SDGs) by 2030, according to the State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2019.

The report, launched on the margins of the High-level Political Forum (HLPF) – the main UN platform monitoring follow-up on States’ actions to the SDGs – currently under way in New York, breaks down statistics by region, and shows that hunger has risen almost 20 per cent in Africa’s subregions, areas which also have the greatest prevalence of undernourishment.

Although the pervasiveness of hunger in Latin America and the Caribbean is still below seven per cent, it is slowly increasing. And in Asia, undernourishment affects 11 per cent of the population. Although southern Asia saw great progress over the last five years, at almost 15 per cent, it is still the subregion with the highest prevalence of undernourishment.

“Our actions to tackle these troubling trends will have to be bolder, not only in scale but also in terms of multisectoral collaboration,” the heads of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organization (WHO) urged in their joint foreword to the report. 

Hunger is increasing in many countries where economic growth is lagging, particularly in middle-income countries and those that rely heavily on international primary commodity trade.

The annual UN report also found that income inequality is rising in many of the countries where hunger is on the rise, making it even more difficult for the poor, vulnerable or marginalized to cope with economic slowdowns and downturns.

“We must foster pro-poor and inclusive structural transformation focusing on people and placing communities at the centre to reduce economic vulnerabilities and set ourselves on track to ending hunger, food insecurity and all forms of malnutrition,” the UN leaders said.

 Food insecurity

This year’s edition of the report takes a broader look at the impact of food insecurity – beyond hunger.

It introduces, for the first time, a second indicator for monitoring Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Target 2.1 on the Prevalence of Moderate or Severe Food Insecurity that shows that 17.2 per cent of the world’s population, or 1.3 billion people, lacked regular access to “nutritious and sufficient food”.

“Even if they were not necessarily suffering from hunger, they are at greater risk of various forms of malnutrition and poor health”, according to the report.

The combination of moderate and severe levels of food insecurity brings the estimate to about two billion people, where in every continent, women are slightly more food insecure than men.

Low birthweight still a major challenge

Turning to children, the report disclosed that since 2012, no progress has been made in reducing low birthweight.

Additionally, while the number of under-age-five children affected by stunting has decreased over the past six years by 10 per cent globally, the pace of progress is too slow to meet the 2030 target of halving the number of stunted children.

Furthermore, overweight and obesity continue to increase throughout all regions, particularly among school-age children and adults.

Income inequality increases the likelihood of severe food insecurity – UN report

To safeguard food security and nutrition, the 2019 report stresses the importance to economic and social policies to counteract the effects of adverse economic cycles when they arrive, while avoiding cuts in essential services.

It maintains that the uneven pace of economic recovery “is undermining efforts to end hunger and malnutrition, with hunger increasing in many countries where the economy has slowed down or contracted”, mostly in middle-income nations.

Moreover, economic slowdowns or downturns disproportionally undermine food security and nutrition where inequalities are greater.

“Income inequality increases the likelihood of severe food insecurity, and this effect is 20 per cent higher for low-income countries compared with middle-income countries”, the report spells out.

The report concludes with guidance on what short- and long-term policies must be undertaken to safeguard food security and nutrition during episodes of economic turmoil or in preparation for them, such as integrating food security and nutrition concerns into poverty reduction efforts using pro-poor and inclusive structural transformations.

Read more...

With half of Somaliland children not in school, UNICEF and partners launch education access programme

INTERNATIONAL, 13 July 2019, Culture and Education - Access to education in Somaliland is extremely limited, with more than 50 per cent of children in Somaliland out of school. In an effort to address the problem, the UN children’s fund, UNICEF, has partnered with the government, and the global fund Education Cannot Wait, to launch a programme designed to help children affected by ongoing crises in the country.

Drought, food insecurity, poverty and inequality are some of the challenges that hinder efforts to get more Somaliland children and youth in schools. The education prospects for children in rural areas, and school age Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Somaliland are particularly poor: only 26 per cent of children in rural communities, and 16 per cent of IDP children, are enrolled in primary schools.

The programme, which will run for three years, has a budget of $64 million, with initial seed money of $6.7 million provided by Education Cannot Wait. The remaining $57.3 million is being sought from additional donors. The programme is expected to provide more than 54,000 children with an education.

UNICEF statement released on Saturday explained that the aim is to “achieve improved learning outcomes for school-aged children who are affected by emergencies”, by increasing access to quality, inclusive, gender-sensitive, child-friendly and sustainable education.

“In our collective quest to reach the Global Goals, it is unacceptable that one in every two children in Somaliland doesn’t have the opportunity of an education”, said Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot Wait. “With the launch of this programme, we firmly stand with these children and youth. We stand with the Government and all our education partners”.

It is unacceptable that one in every two children in Somaliland doesn’t have the opportunity of an education” Yasmine Sherif, Director, Education Cannot Wait

Education, the statement emphasises, is a “central pillar” of the long-term stability and socio-economic growth plans of the Somaliland Government, which “recognizes that the economic growth of the country correlates with the proportion of people with access to education.”

Education Cannot Wait is the global fund for education in emergencies and protracted crises, and is administered under UNICEF’s rules and regulations.  
Education Cannot Wait is the global fund for education in emergencies and protracted crises, and is administered under UNICEF’s rules and regulations. UNICEF is committed to working with the Ministry of Education and Science in Somaliland to strengthen children’s resilience through education, providing technical assistance, pilot projects, and overall system strengthening. 

Read more...

UN chief condemns terror attack in Kismayo, Somalia

INTERNATIONAL, 13 July 2019, Peace and Security - UN Secretary-General António Guterres has condemned the terrorist attack that took place on July 12 in southern Somalia. 

In a statement released on Friday, Mr. Guterres expressed his condolences to the families of those who lost their lives in the attack and wished a swift recovery to the injured.

The attack took place in the port city of Kismayo where, according to media reports, a suicide bomber drove a car containing explosives into the Asasey hotel. Gunmen then stormed the building.

The terror group al-Shabab has reportedly claimed responsibility for the attack, which is believed to have led to the deaths of at least 26 people, making it the worst to hit Kismayo since al-Shabab was forced out of the city in 2012.

The killings took place around 4 months after al-Shabab set off two car bombs in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, reportedly killing more than 20 people, and injuring scores more.

The Secretary-General reaffirmed the support and solidarity of the United Nations with the people of Somalia in their pursuit of a peaceful future.

Read more...

UN’s Guterres condemns ongoing airstrikes on Syria’s hospitals, medical workers

INTERNATIONAL, 12 July 2019, Peace and Security - Reports that airstrikes have hit several health facilities in north-west Syria have been strongly condemned by the UN Secretary-General.

In a statement issued late Thursday evening, António Guterres said that one of the damaged facilities included a large hospital in Maarat al-Numan whose coordinates had been shared with belligerents, through the UN’s de-confliction mechanism.

The development follows escalating violence since April in Idlib, the last opposition-held enclave in the country.

Some three million people live there, many of them displaced by previous clashes between Government and opposition fighters elsewhere in the war-torn country.

Highlighting the impact of the airstrikes on non-combatants, Mr. Guterres insisted that civilians and public buildings must be protected, in line with a 2018 de-escalation agreement overseen by guarantors Russia and Turkey.

The UN Secretary-General also insisted that those responsible for carrying out serious violations of international humanitarian law should be held accountable.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

Soualiga Radio